Trans Women ARE Women: Why Cisgender Feminists Need to Be There for Our Fellow Girls

Nicoll Hernandez-Polanco is a twenty-four year old woman who has spent the last six months being sexually abused in an all-male detention center. How could something so despicable happen to a young girl? Sadly, atrocities like this happen all the time because gender is still socially attributed by genitalia. Nicoll was locked away in an all-male nightmare because she has balls, which the guards often commented on while feeling her up, groping her breasts and butt and pulling her hair 6-8 times a day via ‘pat-down searches’. The only place that Nicoll found refuge was in solitary confinement. It’s been an unimaginable tragedy. Where has the big feminist backlash been? You know, that same backlash over the London “Beach Body” ads? Why weren’t we screaming for Nicoll’s justice the way we screamed about Veet’s “Don’t Risk Dudeness” Campaign?

This is intersectionality.

The stories above catch the main narrative: The cisgender straight women who society acknowledges. But the women of color who live outside of these social constructs (i.e. gay, queer, trans) face daily oppression so far beyond our experience that it’s hard to fully grasp what’s going on.

That’s no excuse. Take interest. Break it down. Fight for Change. Solidarity.

That is intersecionality.

As a cisgender feminist, this story could have just fallen by my personal wayside. What does an illegal immigrant somewhere across the country have to do with me? The oppression of one is the oppression of all. It has everything to do with me. And everything to do with you. Where is the line between Nicoll’s detainment and the imprisonment of Purvi Patel? Injustice is injustice. If we believe in gender equality, then transgender issues must also be a top priority for the cisgender feminist community. What makes me a woman is not the hole between my legs, but the conditions under which I was raised that I happen to agree with. Not everyone agrees with those conditions. We all should still have the right to express ourselves openly and honestly without fear of violence. The fact that transwomen and men commonly face harassment, violence, and sexual assault without any protection from the law, from locking people up in unsafe places with no regard for the person’s gender, to murder cases of trans victims lost to the “Trans Panic Defense”. Another woman should not ever have to experience the terror Nicoll has faced her entire life. Let’s start by fighting to change the atrocity she called life for 6 whole months. Regardless of gender or genitalia, we all need to make sure that women are respected, even in the (in)justice system. Women should not be locked away with men. People should not be locked away at all. That’s for another post.

Nicoll was a victim of the immigration system. Current policies in place locked her up like a criminal for coming to America in search of shelter from the oppression she faced in her country simply for existing. Yet she was welcomed to America by the same harsh conditions. This exposes violent transmisogyny in what’s supposed to be “The United States of America(!)” (*queue patriotic music*). US social policy is shamefully cruel. The average first world feminist cannot stop all atrocities, but we can stop the ones happening on American soil. Nicoll is a human being. It’s that simple. Shame on our current social policies.

We need immediate reform.

I applaud Nicoll’s release and granted asylum. It is because of grassroots organizations like Mariposas Sin Fronteras that Nicoll’s story was able to get the public’s attention to fight for change. But now that our attention has been gotten, we need to continue looking. This story is not finished because Nicoll is free. This is a systemic problem for all transgender people inside the prison industrial complex. The work is not over. Cisgender feminists, join this fight.

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